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20121211
20121211
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
not go as far as i would like to go because my thoughts on the nra and america's gun culture, i believe the nra is the kkk. >> what should be done about hustlers doing skin color to attack opponents. we have a special report. >>> don't be worried about it. i get out the chains, i get free, i save my wife, and i kill awall the white people in the movie. how great is that? >> is that a racist statement by actor jamie foxx? is that something we should be upset about. we'll look at that situation as well. >>> 95% of talk radio in our country is right wing. it's divided our country in a way that we haven't been divided probably since the civil war. >> some liberal americans like rfk, jr. think the conservative media is dominating the discourse. bernie goldberg has some thoughts on that. >>> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the fatherror begins righ facto. >>> i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. confronting evil. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. we are living in a country that is rapidly changing. rules of civility are pretty much fini
. the nra for instance, they represent all gun owners and second amendment believers but not everyone has to pay the nra. nra is still in existence because they do a good job. melissa: mark, what about that? does that mean union workers to prove their worth? >> i think unions fight for workers every day. there is plenty more we can be doing. i've been a vocal critic my entire career in the labor movement people who lay back, don't do enough. making too much in terms of officers salaries or cutting deals with bosses. i certainly believe we need to do better. this is not in any way something to celebrate. this is further tilting playing field in favor of corporations, taking rights away from working people. i disagree with vinnie. nra you can join it or not tell it. your boss isn't telling you in who uncertain terms he prefer if you not and your job might be in jeopardy if you do. melissa: how do you know that is what is going to go on here? unions are well-established. in many -- >> it is multibillion-dollar inindustry, come on, you know this. melissa: they're are already working the shops
. shunichi tanaka is the chairman of the nra. he had this to say. >> translator: under the current circumstances, it's my view that we cannot grant a permit to restart the plant's reactor. >> reporter; the authority will hold a meeting to make a final determination on the fate of the tsuruga nuclear facility. if they conclude the d-1 fault is acte, t plant's operator will not be allowed to restart the number two reactor. it may have to be decommissioned. it will be the second japanese nuclear plant slated for decommissioning. the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant was closed after being crippled by last year's earthquake and tsunami. many other nuclear plants in japan could have active faults running directly underneath them. they include the ohi plant, which the government allowed to go back online in july. these findings are cerin to raise questions about the government's ability to make decisions concerning the regulation of nuclear energy. yoichiro tateiwa, nhk world. >>> the operator of the tsuruga plant issued a statement monday. the japan atomic power company says it's impossib
and gouache or watercolor was such a kindergarten use of media doinpe (nrae by british people, reached a new and wideaudience. -enaing e ocess that crthe shelter drawings. (narrator of documentary) on almost any night during a raid this figure might have been seen wandering about: henry moore the sculptor. here, perhaps, was the one artist most capable of immortalizing the stoic endurance and suffering of these people. (narrator) forty-seven years old at the end of the war, henry moore was talented and charismatic, perfectly poised to become britain's leading artist. a retrospective exhibition at the museum of modern art in new york in 1946 gave moore a foothold in the international arena. the exhibition moved on to chicago, san francisco, and australia. but moore's private life was far from glamorous. he'd found peace and a new home in the pastoral countryside of hertfordshire near theillagef ch hadham. it gave him space to work on larger pieces and to show em outdoors. his life was attuned to the optimism of a britain eager for peace and renewal after six years of war. the birth of a daugh
-abiding citizen, if you pass a background check, if you take a safety course, and in fairness to the nra, they're big on that. if you take a safety course, if you meet all those requirements, you ought to have a gun in your home for protection. perhaps under certain circumstances, you ought to be able to carry a gun, all those things are fine, but there's a whole range of stuff that falls outside that definition that puts us in far more peril than it is likely to protect our safety. consider the circumstance of aurora. since nobody knew for sure that a guy dressed like the joker was going to come in and start spraying bullets everywhere, in order for those in the theater to be armed and ready to respond, if follows they have to be armed at all times. that means you have a bunch of people walking around in the supermarket, at the starbucks, walking their dog, taking their kid to the park, all armed. over the course of a year, how off do you think that would lead to tragedy and how often do you think it would lead to safety? that's my question. >> pure accident, the three stories i read. preside
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)